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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
, almost anything can happen. they could directly challenge each other. jim lehrer could come in, the moderator, directly challenge them. but they really don't know. >> we'll right here with you along the abc news to react and fact check one on one the debate coming up at 6:00 p.m. pacific time, 9:00 p.m. eastern. we have two developing stories from overseas. tonight the city of aleppo t commercial equivalent of they new york city. four car bombs killed nearly 40 people. eyewitnesses described what felt like series of earthquakes. here a square before and after. you can see there reduced to rubble. in iran, something we rarely see. crashes in the streets of tehran. hundreds of protesters take on their own government. outraged toefr collapse of the iranian currency, take an nose dive in the past week, down 40%. that is a record low. that is economists say the tough sanctions before the u.s. government. because of iran's nuclear problems. >>> now we tourn a headline that sounded impabl to us today. word of yet another american airlines flight forced to land. passengers bracing for
correspondent jim avila now telling us the latest. jim? >> reporter: diane, american tonight grounded half its fleet of 757s, its domestic long-range workhorse, taken out of service for a second round of faa monitored fixes to prevent passenger seats from becoming dislodged in the air. at one point, one of them even turned over backwards into the row behind it. the airline's engineering team has decided the locking mechanism that secures the seat to the floor must be enhanced. it's another setback for american, which suffered record delays in september, for what it blamed on labor troubles, claiming its pilots intentionally caused delays twice as often as its competitors, something the pilots' union has denied. the seat trouble has racheted things up to now a safety issue. the seats on three flights came unhinged. just yesterday, american said it finished its inspections but now is ordering mechanics to fix the seats again, wherever the 48 planes involved land next, anywhere in the country. a move that will cause cancellations and more delays through saturday for american. diane? >> all right,
senior national correspondent jim avila right here to tell us what he's saying. jim? >> good evening, diane. tomorrow is judgment day and a judge is expected to sentence jerry sandusky to life and live out the rest of his days in prison. tonight in a highly unorthodox move he put out a daring statement to the penn state college radio station. on the tape he defiantly accuses his victims of lying and insists that he is an innocent man. >> i'm responding to the worst loss of my life. first i looked at myself. over and over i asked why? why didn't we have a fair opportunity to prepare for trial? why have so many people suffered as a result of false allegations? what's the purpose? maybe it will help others. some vulnerable children who could be abused might not be as a result of all the publicity. that would be nice, but i'm not sure about it. i would cherish the opportunity to become a candle for others as they have been a light for me. they can take away my life. they can make me out as a monster, they can treat me as a monster, but they can't take away my heart. in my heart i know i
challenge ch other. jim lehrer could directly challenge them. but they really don't know. >> it is going to be such an exciting night. and a reminder that george and i will be right here with you and the abc news team, ready to react and analyze and fact check. one-on-one, the candidates debate, 9:00 p.m.astern, 6:00 central. >>> and we move on now on "world news" because we have two developing stories from overseas. tonight in syria, the city of aleppo, their new york city, four car bombs killed nearly 40 people. eyewitnesses describe what felt like a series of earthquakes, giant buildings flattened. and here, a square before and after, you can see there, reduced to rubble. >>> and, in iran, something we rarely see. clashes in the streets of tehran, as hundreds of protesters take on their own government. outraged over the collapse of the iranian currency. it's taken a nose dive in the past week, down 40%. and that is a record low. and that is proof, economists say, that tough sanctions by the u.s. government, because of iran's nuclear program, are taking hold. >>> and now, we turn to a
, jim avila. >> 685, what can i do for you? >> roger. got an unusual one for you. >> reporter: no one can remember this happening before. not passengers, so rattled they didn't want to be identified. >> the seats flipped backwards and, so, people were essentially on the laps of the passengers behind them with their legs up in the air. >> reporter: not aviation experts. >> i've never seen anything like that in all my years, 30 years of covering the airline industry. >> reporter: no one can remember airline seats disconnecting from the cabin floor. and now it's happened twice in three days aboard two american airlines 757s. >> during climb-out, rows -- passenger seats row 12, d, e and f came loose out of the floor. >> reporter: american airlines flight 685, from boston to miami, diverted in mid-flight, declaring an emergency and landing at jfk in new york because a row of seats had disengaged from its rails on a nearly full flight. one of the displaced passengers is moved to the flight attendant's jump seat. but fearing turbulence en route, the captain decides to land before the loose r
's senior national correspondent jim avila tells us. >> reporter: boston's logan field, one of americans' boeing 757s, 47 of which, nearly half the fleet taken out of service overnight and into today as the troubled airline tries to make sure no more of its coach seats come loose in flight, as they have three separate times. >> seats 14 a, b, and c, i think, are totally disconnected. >> somehow we introduced failure. we're not sure if it is a mechanical failure or a human failure. >> reporter: american saying today it has identified the problem -- because seats came loose. in one case, flipping passengers on their backs. the seats came in rows of three. the row is held to the floor with what is called a saddle clamp that was improperly installed on the planes where the seats disengaged. >> on the safety side of the situation, american's doing all that it can do right now to ensure that the seats are being looked at and installed as correctly as possible. >> reporter: american says the investigation is still underway, but so far the airline cannot give a solid answer as to why now. these
were just ten feet away. abc's senior national correspondent jim avila was there. >> reporter: this is what three months in the slammer can do to a man. jerry sandusky has lost weight, his skin turned gray and his gregarious, everyone's pal persona, shrunken inward. the arrogance, gone. >> he did not have that annoying grin. he is a defeated man today. >> reporter: and that was before the judge lowered the boom -- not a day less than 30 years, as many as 60. >> he will not get out until he is 97 or 98 years old. so he's going to die in prison. >> reporter: his wife, dottie, in court for support. sandusky complained about the verdict, and in a defiant but trembling voice, proclaimed innocence. "i feel a need to talk. i didn't do these alleged disgusting acts." a more emotional echo of what we heard him say in a public statement release to the penn state radio station. >> they can treat me as a monster, but they can't take away my heart. >> reporter: but in court sandusky would not have the last word. three of his ten victims confronted him face to face. victim five, "i'm haunte
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)